What is Dark Web

Dark Web

Definition:

The
Dark Web
is the part of the World Wide Web hidden from search engines and only accessible through a special browser. It is the opposite of the Clearnet, which is the Network that we all know and that allows us to easily access the pages we are looking for on a daily basis.

The Dark Web is within the Deep Web, but, although its terminology is sometimes confused, they are not exactly the same. The Deep Web accounts for 90% of the Internet and is made up of pages that cannot be accessed directly, but not because they are deliberately hidden, but because they are of ephemeral content (such as searches on a flight page) or paid, for example.

Features of the Dark Web

The Dark Web is a very small proportion of all the information contained on the Internet (only 0.1%) and its bad reputation responds to the misunderstanding that it is usually related to fraudulent behavior. This is the case of the exchange of child pornography, the sale of weapons and drugs, etc. However, most of its pages are of harmless content. In addition, it is a very useful tool to denounce irregularities in countries with digital censorship or as a loudspeaker to spread the ideas of persecuted activists.

They are pages that are not indexed and that have masked IPs that can only be tracked by special browsers. Most are P2P (peer-to-peer) networks or large networks, such as Freenet, I2P or Tor. The latter is the most popular darknet and allows the use of the DuckDuckGosearch engine, which works similarly to Google.

What is Tor and how it works

Tor (acronym for ‘The Onion Router’, the onion routing)is a free software based on Mozilla Firefox that works by encrypted information that travels through nodes, in a system similar to the layers of an onion. In this way, navigation is not traceable and the privacy of those who use it is guaranteed.

Getting started with it is very simple. Simply enter the Top Browser page and select the computer’s operating system. Once downloaded, it will be possible to access a large number of .onion pages, but also Clearweb sites.

The most practical way to start browsing the Dark Web is from The Hidden Wiki,a Wikipedia-like catalog organized by categories. It contains a multitude of articles and links to pages of all kinds (also of dubious reputation).

The main disadvantage of Tor is that navigation is slowed down by its complex encryption system and that it blocks pluggins practically in disuse, such as Flash, RealPlayer or Quicktime. In addition, it discourages the installation of extensions that could cause a security breach. On the contrary, it has the advantage that it allows its download even in countries where it is blocked through a ‘bridge’ during the process.